Tag: PPDKenya

Celebrating with PPDKenya Support Group Cycle 01

The past week has been a series of amazing events for the PPD-Kenya team. Among the highlights of the week that we would love to share is the culmination of the first cycle of our support group therapy. We began the cycle on Saturday 13th January 2018, and over the ten weeks that followed, we have held meetings every other Saturday. Our resident psychologist has tirelessly offered of herself to help the moms in their recovery journeys, and we are so glad she is part of our team, alongside our founder Samoina who is a PPD survivor herself.

We recall in vivid, the emotions that peppered our first meeting that Saturday as the moms poured out their journeys and shared their experience with Postpartum depression (PPD). We cried together, we talked, we held hands, we hugged… we began the road to recovery, and oh what a beautiful journey it has been.

Saturday 10th March 2018 marked the last of five sessions, what has been a truly rewarding and humbling experience. Seeing the progress that each of our five moms has made is a reminder of why we began these support group meetings in the first place. They are at a better place than they were when they first came for the meetings. We continue to remind the moms that PPD is treatable, that there is hope, and even with this hope, recovery can be a long journey.

Even though the sessions for the first cycle have ended, we continue to check in on the moms and have scheduled a meeting after 8 weeks to keep abreast with their journeys. In line with our mission to raise awareness and reduce stigma associated with PPD by providing psychosocial support for moms going through PPD, we are hopeful that this start is a step in the right direction as far as Maternal Mental Health in Kenya is concerned.

Below are some of the photos that we took on Saturday, with cake, lots of it for such a sweet moment. One of the lovely moms brought us cake too, and we couldn’t be more grateful for such a wonderful gesture. Congratulations to the moms of PPD-Kenya cycle 01!

PS: We will be posting details on the second cycle of the PPDKenya support groups soon.

PPS: We do not post any photos of the moms because we respect their privacy, and because one of our core values is confidentiality.

Lastly, Blueberry Cake by Shanna Elle Bakers

 

 

Spread the hope:

The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)

The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)

Postpartum Depression (PPD), same as Postnatal Depression (PND – which by the way, I have found is used a lot in the UK) is one of the most common mental health disorders in women. Statistics show that between 11 and 20% of women who deliver every year will experience symptoms of PPD. That’s about 2 in every 10 women are going to get PPD. One of the tools that has been developed to identify women who are at risk of perinatal (that is both antenatal and postpartum) depression is the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). EPDS is an efficient screening tool that consists of 10 questions listed alongside a set of values. Below are the guidelines for using the EPDS.

  1. The mom-to-be/ mom is asked to tick the answer that describes closely how she has been feeling in the previous 7 days.
  2. All questions must be answered.
  3. Caution should be exercised to ensure that answers are not discussed as this could skew the results. That is, answers should only come from the expectant woman or mother herself.

NOTE: The EPDS is not a diagnostic tool and must be used alongside clinical assessment. For this reason, it should not be used for self-diagnosis. If you go through this set of questions and suspect that you may be suffering, consult a doctor to ensure you get professional help. Secondly, one of the questions (#10) is on suicidal thoughts and must be answered before the report is submitted. If the item is checked, a follow up should be made so as to ascertain the level of risk and make the necessary arrangements for mother and child.

Read More: Why is a PPD support group important?

As you are pregnant or have recently had a baby, we would like to know how you are feeling. Please check the answer that comes closest to how you have felt IN THE PAST 7 DAYS, not just how you feel today. 

Here is an example, already completed. 

I have felt happy:

 [ ] Yes, all the time 

 [X ] Yes, most of the time 

[ ] No, not very often

[ ] No, not at all

This would mean: “I have felt happy most of the time” during the past week. 

Please complete the other questions in the same way.

 

In the past 7 days:

  1. I have been able to laugh and see the funny side of things

[ ] As much as I always could

[ ] Not quite so much now

[ ] Definitely not so much now

[ ] Not at all

 

  1. I have looked forward with enjoyment to things

[ ] As much as I ever did

[ ] Rather less than I used to

[ ] Definitely less than I used to

[ ] Hardly at all

 

*3   .I have blamed myself unnecessarily when things went wrong

[ ] Yes, most of the time

[ ] Yes, some of the time

[ ] Not very often

[ ] No, never

 

  1. I have been anxious or worried for no good reason

[ ] No, not at all

[ ] Hardly ever Yes

[ ] sometimes Yes

[ ] very often

 

*5.  I have felt scared or panicky for no very good reason

[ ] Yes, quite a lot

[ ] Yes, sometimes

[ ] No, not much

[ ] No, not at all

 

*6.  Things have been getting on top of me

[ ] Yes, most of the time I haven’t been able to cope at all

[ ] Yes, sometimes I haven’t been coping as well as usual

[ ] No, most of the time I have coped quite well

[ ] No, have been coping as well as ever

 

*7.  I have been so unhappy that I have had difficulty sleeping

[ ] Yes, most of the time

[ ] Yes, sometimes

[ ] Not very often

[ ] No, not at all

 

 

*8.  I have felt sad or miserable

[ ] Yes, most of the time

[ ] Yes, quite often

[ ] Not very often

[ ] No, not at all

 

*9   I have been so unhappy that I have been crying

[ ] Yes, most of the time

[ ] Yes, quite often

[ ] Only occasionally

[ ] No, never

 

 

*10.The thought of harming myself has occurred to me

[ ] Yes, quite often

[ ] Sometimes

[ ] Hardly ever

[ ] Never

 

SCORING

QUESTIONS 1, 2, & 4 (without an *)

Are scored 0, 1, 2 or 3 with top box scored as 0 and the bottom box scored as 3

QUESTIONS 3, 5¬10 (marked with an *)

Are reverse scored, with the top box scored as a 3 and the bottom box scored as 0

Scores

0-9: Scores in this range may indicate the presence of some symptoms of distress that may be short-lived and are less likely to interfere with day to day ability to function at home or at work. However if these symptoms have persisted more than a week or two further enquiry is warranted.

10-12 : Scores within this range indicate presence of symptoms of distress that may be discomforting. Repeat the EPDS in 2 weeks time and continue monitoring progress regularly

. If the scores increase to above 12 assess further and consider referral as needed.

13 +: Scores above 12 require further assessment and appropriate management as the likelihood of depression is high. Referral to a psychiatrist/psychologist may be necessary.

Item 10: Any woman who scores 1, 2 or 3 on item 10 requires further evaluation before leaving the office to ensure her own safety and that of her baby.

 

Resource Material

Source: Cox, J.L., Holden, J.M., and Sagovsky, R. 1987. Detection of postnatal depression: Development of the 10-item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. British Journal of Psychiatry 150:782-786.

Screening for antenatal depression with the Edinburgh Depression Scale

Spread the hope:

Treatment options for Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression (PPD), as mentioned in the previous post, is one of the most common perinatal mood disorders globally, with at least 1 in every 7 mothers getting affected.

Read on the symptoms of Postpartum Depression

Looking out for these symptoms is an effective way to gain clarity into this condition for the simple reason that there is not a single specific test that diagnoses the presence of PPD. Consequently, for therapy to begin, health practitioners are tasked with collecting extensive information as pertains to an individual’s medical past, their health history as well as the circumstances surrounding their pregnancy; generally a background check into their life.

Once this is complete, Contine Reading…

Spread the hope:

Facts and Symptoms of Postpartum Depression (PPD)

Postpartum Depression is one of the most common perinatal mood disorders that affect women after child birth. According to Postpartum International (PSI), 1 in 7 women will suffer PPD in their lifetime. To bring this closer home, think about seven of your friends who are new moms. It is likely that 1 of the 7 will struggle with PPD. In Kenya, there are more than 1.5 Million births annually (Statistics from UNICEF). Assuming that most of these births are not multiple births, we can assume that as many as 200,000 women are predisposed to PPD in Kenya alone. These are sobering statistics, and it is this grim reality that spurred us to raise awareness, reduce stigma of PPD and provide psychosocial support for affected moms. With this in mind, what are some of the symptoms associated with PPD? In an attempt to reduce stigma of PPD, we have decided to add these symptoms without the medical jargon,and as simply as possible. Continue Reading…

Spread the hope:

Enjoy this blog? Follow our work.